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New research shows that some marine species are more vulnerable to climate change than others

New research shows that some marine species are more vulnerable to climate change than others

Certain marine species will fare much worse than others as they become more vulnerable to the effects of climate change, a new UBC study has found.

After analyzing the biological characteristics of 1,074 marine fish and shellfish, the study identified 294 species that are most at-risk due to climate change by 2050. Species most at-risk include the Eastern Australian salmon, yellowbar angelfish, toli shad, sohal surgeonfish and spotted grouper.

The genome of millet sequenced

The genome of millet sequenced

A study coordinated by an international consortium of French (IRD), Indian and Chinese researchers has enabled the genome sequence for millet to be obtained for the first time. This discovery improves our understanding of the organisation and evolution of the genome of this cereal, which provides food security of the poorest people in the world. Secondly, because it provides new prospects for selecting or improving varieties of millet which may be better equipped to cope with climate change for almost 100 millions people.

Weed cover in olive orchards enhances the ecosystem’s capacity as a CO2 sink

Weed cover in olive orchards enhances the ecosystem’s capacity as a CO2 sink

Scientists at the University of Granada (UGR) studied the effects and benefits of maintaining vegetation, or weed cover, in olive grove soil. In a recently-published article in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, these scientists showed their results after a year of measuring an olive grove in Jaen (SE Spain), which show that weed cover significantly increases carbon uptake, acting as a sink for one of the principal greenhouse effect gases, CO2.

Clean cooking push suffers from “shocking” lack of funding

Clean cooking push suffers from “shocking” lack of funding

Funding to boost the numbers of people with access to electric power and clean cooking is too low to meet the global goal for everyone to have modern, reliable and affordable energy by 2030, international organisations said on Monday (18th Sept 2017).

Just over 3 billion people still use traditional, solid fuels like firewood and dung to cook, the latest data shows.

Is your chocolate bar fuelling deforestation in West Africa?

Is your chocolate bar fuelling deforestation in West Africa?

Your afternoon chocolate bar may be fuelling climate change, destroying protected forests and threatening elephants, chimpanzees and hippos in West Africa, research suggests.

Well-known brands, such as Mars and Nestle, are buying through global traders cocoa that is grown illegally in dwindling national parks and reserves in Ivory Coast and Ghana, environmental group Mighty Earth said.

Public starkly unaware of the tough realities of farming

Public starkly unaware of the tough realities of farming

According to new research by The Prince’s Countryside Fund, the UK public appears to have a rosy view of farming life, with 1 in 4 (25%) UK adults liking the idea of giving up their day job and working on a farm.

However, the findings of the ‘Who’d be a Farmer Today?’ report, launched to mark the start of National Countryside Week (Monday 31st July to Sunday 6th August) highlights a disconnect between the positive perception and the tougher realities of the profession.

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