Research News

Children and smokers face pesticide danger

Pesticides used in food, tobacco and marijuana production are placing children and smokers in potential risk, a study has found. Farmers across the world use pesticides to keep bugs and weeds at bay during the growing process. However, this often means these potent chemicals find their way into our bodies and can build up over time. An analysis of data from the US suggests that children and smokers of tobacco are being exposed to the highest levels of pesticide residues.

Dangerous for soil? First experimental study on the influence of micro-plastics on soil & its micro-organisms

Dangerous for soil? First experimental study on the influence of micro-plastics on soil & its micro-organisms

Soil microorganisms play a central role in many biogeochemical cycles, such as the decomposition of organic matter and the binding of carbon in soil. A research project at the Freie Universität in Berlin has provided the first experimental evidence that microplastics can change the biophysical conditions of soil as well as the functional activity of microbes.

Adolescents’ cooking skills strongly predict future nutritional well-being

Adolescents’ cooking skills strongly predict future nutritional well-being

Confidence in cooking ability led to fewer fast food meals, more meals as a family, and more frequent preparation of meals with vegetables in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Evidence suggests that developing cooking and food preparation skills is important for health and nutrition, yet the practice of home cooking is declining and now rarely taught in school. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that developing cooking skills as a young adult may have long-term benefits for health and nutrition.

Is your Easter egg bad for the environment?

Is your Easter egg bad for the environment?

A recent study by researchers at The University of Manchester and published in the journal Food Research International has looked at the carbon footprint of chocolate and its other environmental impacts. It has done this by assessing the impacts of ingredients, manufacturing processes, packaging and waste.

The study estimates that the UK chocolate industry produces about 2.1m tonnes of greenhouse gases (GHG) a year. This is equivalent to the annual emissions of the whole population of a city as large as Belfast. It also found that it takes around 1000 litres of water to produce just one chocolate bar.